Hold towels for embroidery the easy, loop-free way

If you have ever used self-adhesive stabilizer to hold a towel for embroidery, it may have seemed easy at first. But when you have to remove the self-adhesive, the going gets tough. After removal, you have pulled loops on the back of the towel that look terrible. In this video excerpt from my video ... [More]

Back Side Up

Sometimes, the best side of the fabric is the back. I found that out while making a throw quilt for my daughter. It was based around a Catkin panel by Julie Paschkis. I love her folk/carved block-style approach to her fabric designs. My daughter loves cats so it was perfect. The surroun... [More]

Machine Features Everybody Needs

  We are excited to have Eileen Roche, Editor of Designs in Machine Embroidery share this content with you, which was originally posted on Eileen’s Machine Embroidery Blog :When Nancy and I were creating Machine Embroidery in 6 Easy Lessons series, I delved into the b... [More]

Fix Loopy Threads

When you remove your embroidery work from the hoop, here's something that ranks up there with crooked embroidery - loopy threads from poor tensions. I have two methods to repair them. In this video exceprt from my video "Repairing Embroidery Mishaps", I show you two ways to secure tho... [More]

Stabilizer Tips and Tricks

Stabilizers are the workhorse of the embroidery industry. Since they are used literally every time we stitch, it helps to share tricks of the trade. Keeping Waste to a Minimum I have found that keeping the stabilizer width intact, rather than trimming it to the hoop size, eliminates unnecessary ... [More]

Please Welcome Me

Hello Everyone..... First of all let me introduce myself, my name is Pardeep Takhar. I have been working here at AnnTheGran (ATG) since 2007...... that's 6 years ....wow that's a really long time, time really does fly by. Here, at ATG, I have been involved in customer service, adding new pr... [More]

Upscale Bed Linens – Tips for stitching gorgeous machine embroidery designs on sheets

  We are excited to have Eileen Roche, Editor of Designs in Machine Embroidery share this content with you, which was originally posted on Eileen’s Machine Embroidery Blog I love embroidered bed linens. They are such a treat to slide between as you end a long day. Here a... [More]

Embroidery Advisor Presents : Coffee Wrap Project

Materials: Coffee Wrap Saying or Type Designe.g.  Coffee Wrap Types In The HoopCoffee Wrap Sayings In The HoopCoffee TypesCoffee Sayings Coffee Wrap Template.pdf file (printed) Fabric 2 Pieces each 4.5” H x 13” W at least Quilting Fabric 1 P... [More]

Using a Stabilizer Window

When embroidering several of the same sized designs using adhesive tear-away stabilizer, you can save time and supplies by creating a stabilizer window. Hoop the adhesive tear-away like you normally would. Score the paper backing inside the hoop and peel it away. Embroider the design and ... [More]

Big and Beautiful...Embroidering Large Letters That Last

I love embroidering towels - they're my favorite monogrammed gift, and this past Christmas I really kept the machine humming with monogrammed towels for just about everyone. The challenge is that large letters have very wide satin stitches that can snag. In this video, I show you how to cre... [More]

Avoid Sinking Stitches

This week, I thought I would share some problems I had with stitches sinking into the design while creating the Scalloped Valentine project. I love to use wool felt in many of my projects. The cream-colored wool I used in the Scalloped Valentine projects was felted, meaning it had been washed in hot... [More]

Fancy Water Bottle Caddies

     I am having entirely too much fun.  I admit that freely.  Ever sinceI started creating my own motifs in my digitizing software, I have beenfinding ever more ways to use them.  My latest is this Cathedral Windowswater bottle caddy.  I created a panel that ... [More]

An Indispensable Tool

  We are excited to have Eileen Roche, Editor of Designs in Machine Embroidery share this content with you, which was originally posted on Eileen’s Machine Embroidery Blog I can’t believe how indispensable this tool is. Recently, I was stitching 24 onesies, a daun... [More]

Scalloped Valentine Hearts

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Memory Hearts - Valentine Special

Valentine's Day is less than a month away, so here is a project with heart! Memory Hearts can be created for any special occasion: births, baptisms, engagements, marriages. These were made for a baby girl and baby boy. Actually, I made two sets of each so that the grandmothers, both first ... [More]

Snowflakes for Sandy Hook

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The Avid Embroiderer Presents - Shadow Embroidery

The Avid Embroiderer Presents - Shadow Embroidery

After seeing an article about Shadow Embroidery (SE), I did some research to bring that style to you.

The first thing I found was that most of the YouTube articles on SE were about hand embroidery. It is a great look and easily achieved with handwork. I found the instructions for machine creation in an old Designs In Machine Embroidery magazine.

The details and instructions were lengthy but interesting.
  • Use a fine muslin, a lightly woven fabric like cotton organza or fine batiste.
  • The design will be displayed on the 'wrong side' of the fabric. Run the design on the 'back' of your project.
  • It is certainly made to go on just about anything that you would normally embroider upon.
  • It works best with a design that is mainly made by fill stitches (last months' emoji freebie is an example).
  • Be sure your bobbin tension is accurate, see below for the test stitching for your design format.
  • Small details do not do well in this configuration, however, if not eliminated/skipped from the design, it tends to have much more color showing in the design.

I have used a sheet of a linen fabric that does not have a back and front side. They are the same on both sides. I did some experiments when I found that small details did not give the result I am trying to achieve. I adjusted my tension but that did not change those details.

This design is from the group already on my machine. This would be the backside if the fabric had a differing front to back. I used two layers of Heat-Away because I was planning to tear it off when I was done.



Here it is with the stabilizer removed.



And here is the 'shadow' effect. 



This design is interesting because nearly all of the stitches are the fill type. But, as you see, the smaller areas, like the red on the wings, have more than their share of the top thread. I have observed that so many times in my designs, I guess that is normal. I think it is interesting.

One way I would use it would be to have a 'before' and 'after' type of designs. They would compliment each other but have a totally different feel. Additionally, I can see this as embroidery on a bridal gown where some designs are normal and some are the shadow effect.

I might even try for a design that is partly standard and partly in the shadows. I would place markings to identify positions, turn the fabric over, and turn the design fully left or right. That would make the project unique. Most people, including embroiderers who don't read my blog, would not know how the effect was created.

As noted above, here are the tests for checking your thread tension.

TensionTestDST.zip (372B)

TensionTestEXP.zip (248B)

TensionTestHUS.zip (351B)

TensionTestJEF.zip (300B)

TensionTestPCS.zip (4.1KB)

TensionTestPES.zip (1.1KB)

TensionTestXXX.zip (295B)

Due to circumstances beyond my control, there is no freebie this time. Sorry about that.  

Comments (2) -

stoby1@netzero.net 1/15/2018 1:38:42 AM

What you are showing is not shadow embroidery.  The "shadow" means you can see a hint of the stitch pattern and color, done on the wrong side, on the right side of the fabric.   That's why you need a fine, light weight fabric that you can see through.   There's nothing like this in your example.

You are so correct.  The original method I found did mention that fact and I did forget that detail. Actually, the technique is done with hand embroidery on translucent fabric.  

Here is a URL that you can see the method done with hand embroidery.
www.thesewingdirectory.co.uk/.../  

Pat, The Avid Embroiderer

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Keeping It Simple - Embroidered Baby T-shirts for Cool Summer Fun

Keeping It Simple - Embroidered Baby T-shirts for Cool Summer Fun

I am not sure why but many of our favorite shops for infant clothes have gone out of business over the past year or so.  These shops featured handmade items that were unique but really reasonable in price.  In the past, when life was too busy to sew we frequently bought clothes for the girls at these cute little boutiques.  I know there are shops online with cute things that you won't see on every other child and maybe we are nuts but we really like to see and touch what we are buying as often as possible.  Plus with this being the third little girl on its way our daughter wants to use as many things as possible from the two before her.  So, one day she brought over all her old "designer" diapers and we tried to figure out what to do for a July baby (both the others were born in the winter).  After digging in my stash and a quick visit to the fabric store here is what we came up with:

    

Baby Wrap style T shirts washed, dried and ironed if needed.

Two sided fusible interfacing such as Trans-WebTM or HeatnBond®

Fabric Square that is larger than the embroidery appliqué shape (I cut mine 5")

Soft cut away stabilizer

Temporary adhesive spray

Large straight sewing pins

Embroidery appliqué shape (To download free ones see the link below)

Embroidery thread to coordinate

 

What you do for appliqué T:

1.  Following directions on fusible package fuse the interfacing to back side of the fabric square.  Remove the backing if there is one. (You do not have to use the fusible but since infant items are washed so often I always do.)

2.  Print out a template of the appliqué shape.  Cut it out and pin in place on the T-shirt front.

3.  Hoop 2 layers of the stabilizer.  Spray a little adhesive around the edges of the inside of the hoop.  Gently center the T-shirt with the template and press in place.  Be careful that you do not pull it out of shape.  I put a pin at the top and bottom of the hoop  as extra security.  I also roll up the rest of the T and pin so it will not get caught under the hoop later.

4.  Carefully place the hoop on your machine making sure the template center is lined up with the needle.  Remove the template and embroider the first color. 

 

5.  Place the fabric square in place on top of the T-shirt.  Embroider the second color.  Carefully remove the hoop and place on a flat surface.  Cut around the outside of the embroidered shape close to the sewn line. 

6.  Carefully place the hoop back on the machine and embroider the rest of the design. 

7. Cut around the stabilizer. Press the appliqué to fuse it to the T-shirt. 

 

Note: These little irons are great for this but you can use your big one if you like.

 

For T-shirts with embroidery designs that are not appliqué:

Baby Wrap style T shirts washed, dried and ironed if needed.

Fabric Square that is larger than the embroidery appliqué shape (I cut mine 5")

Soft cut away stabilizer

Temporary adhesive spray

Large straight sewing pins

Embroidery design

Embroidery thread to coordinate

 

What you do:

1.  Print out a template of the embroidery design.  Cut it out and pin in place on the T-shirt front.

2.  Hoop 2 layers of the stabilizer.  Spray a little adhesive around the edges of the inside of the hoop.  Gently center the T-shirt with the template and press in place.  Be careful that you do not pull it out of shape.  I put a pin at the top and bottom of the hoop  as extra security.  I also roll up the rest of the T and pin so it will not get caught under the hoop later.

4.  Carefully place the hoop on your machine making sure the template center is lined up with the needle.  Remove the template and embroider the design. 

5.  Cut around the stabilizer.

Here are some more we embroidered since babies use lots of these:

 

Here are links to the designs we used:

The dragonfly

The paisley

The Giraffe

Click here to download the the flower and heart appliqué shapes.

And here is a whole collection of applique frames.

I know we look back at the baby pictures of our girls and sometimes have to take them out and look on the back to remember which one it is since they often had on the same outfit.  With these we will surely be able to tell which pictures belong to this special little girl.  And there will be little chance that we will see another child sporting the same outfit this summer. 

If you have little boys to sew for here are some design links that could work as well as using the appliqué rectangle.

 Kids Toys

Nursery Decor

Once Upon a Time

If you are sewing for infants you might like these blogs as well

Designer Infant Gowns

Touch and Feel blanket

Enjoy the spring but be sure to take time to do what you love.

Take care,

DB

Comments (6) -

How do you do the daiper covers, were they simply purchased? or made? and how would I get some for a newborn or 6 mos.?  Thanks


Those are adorable!


I too am interested in the diaper covers.  Please tell us how you did them or where you got them.  Your blogs are so very interesting.  Thanks  Kae


Thank you so much for the cute freebies!  I have a new great grandchild and I'm sure these will look terrific on her!


thecomputerist 4/25/2010 9:02:11 PM

That Paisley design is OUTSTANDING!


I have used your outlines for sometime and I love them.  You get 34 designs for under $20 - what a bargain!


Thanks for reminding me of the outlines, I want to use them on an upcoming project.


Pat


I have not made the diaper covers.  We looked into it and the cost of some of the products needed was not reasonalbe for making just a few.  My daughter got some as gifts and purchased others online from www.etsy.com.  I have embroidered some panty style diaper cover blanks for little girls.  You can get these from allaboutblanks.com.  I did make a pattern for the simple  fleece diaper cover but have not tried it yet.  If it works out OK I will post it.


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