The Best Kept Stabilizer Secret

You likely do not have this in your stabilizer stash, but it comes in quite handy for a variety of uses - heat-away stabilizer.


I've tried several brands but like the Stitch-N-Heat variety by AllStitch the best. Here are some reasons why:

  • It has a textured side that helps keep it in place when stitching.

  • It is so strong, you can use it when quilting with redwork embroidery. Hoop the heat-away, place the block on top (secured with temporary spray adhesive) and stitch your design. When done, just pull the clear stabilizer away.

  • It is perfect for freestanding applique, like these Memory Hearts - no messy tear-away stabilizer showing around the edges.
  • You don't have to use an iron to remove the stabilizer, it tears away easily. Heat-away stabilizers are typically used for embroidering on items that you do not want to hoop and can't get wet, as you would when removing water-soluble stabilizer.

  • When embroidering on fabrics that you can't hoop, like this ornament, heat-away is a great alternative to water-soluble stabilizer. Add some spray adhesive to hooped heat-away stabilizer and you have a clean surface to support your embroidery.
  • It makes the ideal surface to draw or trace designs you want to use as quilting motifs because you can see through it. Trace your design with a extra-fine permanent marker, pin it to the piece you want to quilt, and stitch along the lines. When you are done, it simply tears away.

Try it. I'm sure you will find many other uses for heat-away stabilizer!

Debbie SewBlest

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Battenburg Lace 12/12/08

Battenburg Lace 12/12/08

Battenburg (Battenberg) lace has also been known as Renaissance lace.  Created by using loops of woven tape secured together by yarn to form a pattern it originated in the 16th century. It regained popularity at the end of the 19th through the beginning of the 20th Century. This new popularity came when it was used by Queen Victoria who created a duchy for her daughter's new husband, the Duke of Battenberg.

Today, it is commonly used for tablecloths, Christmas tree skirts, parasols and bridal gowns.

 

Battenburg Lace parasols and fans are often used in Civil War reenactments, vintage weddings, French royal court reenactments, photography props and speaks of gentility and refinement.

 

 

 

 

 

Close up showing simple tape with few fillings

That lace is so lovely, and I am going to be using the white Battenburg tree skirt which is available here at AnnTheGran.  I did 'age' the skirt with a 'tea bath' because I wanted it to have an antique feel. 

I grew up in Akron, Ohio in the mid 50s.  It too was a time of great innocence and simplicity.  I remember the snow and cold days and an occasional ‘snow day’ away from school.  I remember hearing the coal furnace being stoked and feeling the heat.  One of my fondest memories is the day after Thanksgiving, the two ‘downtown’ department stores, O’Neils and Polsky’s would unveil their Christmas Showcase windows. 

Those windows were filled with winter scenes of elves that would move around in Santa’s Workshop and children dancing around Christmas Trees that were decorated to the tip top star.  They were animated and each store had about 6 or 8 windows, each with a different scene. There were animated people, animals and magic was everywhere.  It was a delight to see.

I wondered if I could capture that feeling somehow in embroidery.  With all the dazzling things children see and technology driving their toys and world, how can I help them to see a simpler time of this season?  Embroidery is so creative, but can it compete?

So, I captured them together and here are the (nearly finished) results.  I did have a problem with my embroidery machine and was unable to finish the skirt before the blog due time.  You will get the idea as is!

 

 

 

I used several Christmas designs that I had collected previously but I wanted more, so I selected the Candy Land Christmas Set and I am so glad I did. 

This set has excellent shading woven into its designs.  The items markings give them a 3D look.  I used metallic threads for the shading and I love the outcome.  For instance, the ornament has a yellow loop design and, while difficult to see, I used silver metallic thread in the shade area.  The yellow peeks through the silver and is just delightful.

I also used the same colors from design to design.  For instance, I used silver metallic in each, but also used the same pinks and reds for continuity.  They tie together nicely.

I have a tendency to use my own colors rather than that of the designer.  Of course, if I were doing a dog or horse, I would use the correct colors; but in this case, I can make it personalized just for me.

Thanks for reading my postings, I am delighted to spend this time with you.  Please do ask any questions and tell me what you might like to learn about next.  I do have a couple of things in the planning stages:

 

ü  Lafayette Curve

ü  French Country

ü  Entredeau

ü  Dotted Swiss

ü  Dantela cutwork

ü  Egyptian cotton

ü  Silks

ü  Metallic thread

 

What do you want to know about next year?

 

Best wishes to you and yours, Pat

Comments (5) -

Wow!!! How beautiful is that? I would love to learn how to do a parasol? Are there instructions somewhere? Can you use a lace design and add it to the bottom of an umbrella, (if you can find a white one). Is there more information on this?


I love your tree skirt. What a great idea. And when you tea stain it, I know it will be wonderful. I like your idea of using metalic threads for the shading. Too bad it does not show up very well.  I too change my colors, except for peoples skin tones and animals. I cannot ever get them right on my own.


Ideas for next year? The only thing I barely recognize in your list is the Dotted Swiss, so as far as my vote goes, any one of those will be great.


Keep that information coming. I am learning soooo much.


cme   8^)


I forgot... dummy me!!!!!!


Have a very Merry Christmas and a safe New Year.


cme  8^)))


sweetpeanuts 12/22/2008 11:41:44 PM

Hi Pat,


I grew up in Akron and Cleveland and I do remember Polsky's and ONeils. Went to Akron U even.  Saw Stan Hywet once at Christmas and which was the old fashion country Christmas!  This skirt would fit in perfectly!  


The skirt is beautiul and I personally would love to be able to do the Battenburg lace.  


Chris


That tree skirt is beautifuly.  You talked about growing up in the 50s so we must be near the same age.  I was in Portsmouth, VA and I remember that the day after Thanksgiving was the day the Christmas music started, the stores were getting decorated and Santa was coming to town so we could tell him what we wanted. Those were the good old days.  Then you look to Christmas as a time to be with family and presents were what you needed, not so much as what you wanted.  This year Christmas started before Halloween.  By the time Christmas I don't want to hear another carol.  Once again that skirt is great.  I hope to one day get enought nerve to try something different.  Happy Holidays. Margie


Hello all!  I did have such wonderful memories of my youth.  Then again, we tend to remember what we want to remember, right?  


I wanted to put out that list because I was finding so many fun things and was getting too many ideas.  For instance, the Lafayette Curve is a variation on the French Curve - remember that one?  


I was wondering if anyone would be interested in the parasols because I was thinking of planning something for pre-Easter for little girls.  How cute would that be?  Would a little girl just standout with that?  I am a grandmother, and my girls are not very interested in sweet things like that, but I can see them having a photo taken with a parasol!  


Thanks for the input, keep it coming!


Pat


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