The Intermediate Embroiderer’s Bucket List

Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

The Intermediate Embroiderer’s Bucket List

Last week, I posted the Embroiderer’s Bucket List for newbies. If you missed it, click here.   Many of you commented on the list – some of you have already checked off all 10 items while others promised to work through the list. Here’s a new list for those of you who are ready to move on to more challenging machine embroidery tasks.

  1. Embroider a t-shirt.  Placement is crucial when placing a design on the left chest. It should sit fairly high on the chest as you want to avoid the bull’s eye effect on the bust point. Also, embroidery that drifts close to the sleeve seam and/or armpit is very unprofessional. Use Designs’ Perfect Placement Kit left chest template for added insurance.
     
  2. Embroider a sweatshirt.  Bulky sweatshirts can be cumbersome when hooped so tame it by turning it inside out and resting the bulk of the garment above the hoop. Plan the embroidery placement, fuse polymesh stabilizer to the wrong side of the design area and turn the garment inside out. Hoop the design area and ‘open’ the shirt to expose the design area. Carefully attach the hoop to the machine.Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  3. Edge Embroidery- try a border hoop, you’ll enjoy the simplicity of the clamp-style hoop. Plan your designs close to the fabric/garment edge and stitch away!
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  4. Appliqué.  When I teach across the country, I’m always amazed to learn how many embroiderers haven’t tried an appliqué design. Now’s the time – I’ll bet you’ll love how much impact appliqué adds with just a little effort.
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  5. 3-d appliqué.  It literally pops off the fabric. It’s fun, eye-catching and quite doable. These pretty little winged creatures adorned the first cover of Designs.
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  6. Stitch a border with evenly spaced designs. Learn how to plan the whole layout, and then adjust as the stitching proceeds. Measure the length of the fabric, measure the design, divide by a manageable number (this is the number of repeats) and mark the fabric. Start stitching, then continue to check the placement after you add each design.
     
  7. Stitch a matching set of napkins. You would think monogramming a set of napkins would appear on the newbie bucket list. But it’s actually a fairly tricky project. First, you want all the napkins to match and you really don’t want to purchase 3 or 4 extra just to get 6 that look alike. Since the monogram is normally placed close to a corner (either on-point or straight) it can be challenging to hoop. Just ask my Stitching Sister, Marie Zinno, she created these gorgeous napkins.
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  8. Embellish the back pocket of a pair of blue jeans.  You only get one chance to do this right so it’s imperative to set your self up for success. First, measure the pocket and select a design that fills the space. Second, fuse the pocket shut so that you’ll be stitching one layer of fabric – not two. Here’s a popular Designs cover from the past.
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  9. Design a layout for a skirt.  A skirt is a large (usually!) blank canvas. It’s the easiest garment to flesh your design skills on because a basic a-line skirt has straight seams, one horizontal hem and minimal tailoring features. You’ll learn how embroidery draws the eye to the figure – sometimes that’s a good thing sometimes not!
    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

  10. Create buttonholes with your embroidery machine.  Let your embroidery machine do one of sewing’s most daunting tasks – buttonholes. All you have to worry about is marking the placement of the buttonholes and the digital file will take over the rest – making perfect duplicates, taming bulky layers of fabric and providing clean, crisp stitches. I’ve shown you how to do this in a previous post – click here for details on buttonholes.

    Eileen's Machine Embroidery Blog

Thanks for reading!

Reprinted with permission from Eileen's Blog.

Comments (1) -

chunsaker50 9/22/2012 2:27:56 PM

I just got my first Eileen's Blog. Thank you for sharing all the wonderful information. I've been digitizing and machine embroidering 14 years and I just learned 2 great tricks...buttonholes and zippers. I'm so excited to try them.  God Bless You for sharing your knowledge!


Please login to comment
LaRueSews-Quilts-Beads are Fun Too, a 30 minute project

LaRueSews-Quilts-Beads are Fun Too, a 30 minute project

Hi there EveryBuddy.  Three weeks has come and gone, again. Blogging time is here.  I hope that all of you have been diligently making the last block I gave you in LaRueSews BOM.  This time it will be a quick one, both BLOG and block. Wink

I have been out of town for a few days.  We went to Nashville.  My daughter and her family live there.  We went to watch our two granddaughters in their marching band.  The older one, Lauren plays the French horn and the younger one, Holly, plays the Alto sax.  They really looked great in their uniforms and sounded wonderful too.  There was also a concert with their community concert band In Mt. Juliet, TN.  It’s really enjoyable when adults combine their efforts and keep their music skills “in tune.”  The concert was to benefit the Mt. Juliet High School Band Boosters. The whole thing was really great, but it put me in a time crunch for writing this blog.

I’d like to bring you a really quickie little project that makes a pretty and unique gift for someone.  It is EASY.

beads

Necklace recipe:
Ingredients:

  • 1 Small strip of multi-color fabric, about 2 ½ inches by width of fabric. (measure the circumference of the marbles and add seam allowance)
  • About 12 to 14 marbles, 1 1/4 inch circumference
  • About 15 beads, hole must be large enough to thread your fabric tube.

Measure the circumference of your marbles, add ½ inch for seam allowance.  Cut the fabric strip.  My strip was 2 1/4" by width of fabric.  Sew 1/4" seam the length of the strip, making a long tube.  (Stitch twice to reinforce)  Trim strip to 1/8", or smallest you can handle.  Turn tube to right side.  Be sure your tube isn’t too tight to insert marbles, and the holes in beads are large enough for fabric tube.  (I don’t do beading, so I am not exact on measurements, you just need to experiment, like I did.)  Trim ends of strips to a long angle. 

The next step is to insert marbles and add beads.  Put a marble inside the tube and push it to the center.  Thread a bead and push it next to the marble.  Continue, marble bead, marble bead, until you have your desired bead length, add as many marbles and beads as you like.  You can work from both ends.  I finished the ends of the necklace by folding in thirds and stitching by machine, to make the tube smaller for ties.

Here are three photos.  One is a necklace with unfinished ties, the second is a necklace with ties sewn, and the last is a necklace of Christmas fabric that is started, to show the slanted, cut ends of the tube and the insertion of a marble.

beads

beads

beads

Our next BOM quilt block is the Snowball block.  It is a very simple block.  It can be combined with other blocks in pattern, and it can be used as a focal block for Fussy Cutting to feature a fabric.  Later on, I will use this block to show you an applique technique.

block

 block

 

As I said in the beginning of this Block of the Month, I am giving you the patterns with very little instruction.  Just be sure that each of your blocks measure 12 ½ inches, each.  In the finished quilt, each block will measure 12 inches, because of the construction of the quilt.

You can still begin this BOM and work along with us.  Go back in my archives, Blog-Your Wish is My Command and follow along with the instructions.  If my count is correct. We now have about twenty people in the group.  Or, if you wish, you may go to the tags at the bottom of this page, and click on Block of The Month. the previous blocks and BLOGS are there.

Last year about this time, I told you about a quilt that I planned to start.  Of course, it is applique.  I have five blocks almost finished or in progress. This photo shows the first block in this quilt.  I’ll show more when I get them finished.

applique quilt

Since my time is running short, I’ll just say “So long for Now” and “Make Something Quilted This Week”.  See y'all next time.

Stitches to you,
LaRue

Comments (5) -

That necklace is a neat idea, thank you.  Love the covered wagon!


I'm still here LaRue, that block is absolutely gorgeous.


It has given me the incentive to go to my fabric store TODAY to get the applique fabric for that Baltimore Quilt I told you about on that site here in Oz. We now have all the blocks and border designs and awaiting the instructions.


Vada


Sherry


I can't take credit for the necklace.  A friend was wearing one and I copied it.  Glad you like it.


I love the covered wagon too.  I think tha't what attracted me most to this quilt. That is the center block in a quilt I think it's called Not Anywhere Near Baltimore, A Prarie Version.  Not sure of the correct title.


Vada,


I'm glad to hear you are getting serious about your BAQ


Thank you both for the complments and the comments.


Stitches . .


LaRue


I bet I still have one the necklaces from when this was a fashion statement WAY back in the dark ages...won't give too much of my age away...I thought they were neat then, will be glad to get to wear them again.  Thanks for showing the youngsters how to do them.  ;>) MS


thecomputerist 11/9/2009 1:01:58 PM

I remember those necklaces, and they are fun, easy and great to wear.


Thanks for bringing back a great item!


Pat


Please login to comment